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Foxburrow Woods has been reopened.  As always please treat the site, and other users, with repect. Is is a site that anyone can use for a variety of reasons.  Groups of young learners are frequently on site as are volunteers and people on training courses. If you are walking a dog at Foxburrow you must follow the rules: Dogs on leads or close control - that means responsive to effective voice commands and in your sight.  Faeces must be picked up no matter where it is. Do not let your dog run up to and interfer with other people on site. Not everybody is comfortable with dogs, especially children. Do not assume other dogs will be 'ok'. We thank you for your cooperation in helping Foxburrow operate as a multifunctional site; for the enjoyment of all.

 

Press Release - 30 November 2018

Wychwood Project Appoints David Astor, CBE as Chair and Neil Clennell as CEO

David Astor, CBE has been confirmed as Chairman of the Board for the Wychwood Project (Oxfordshire) Ltd. at the charity’s November AGM at which time it was also announced that Neil Clennell would be joining as Chief Executive in January 2019 from the Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire Wildlife Trust (BBOWT).

David’s appointment follows the retirement of Richard Lord, QC who served the Wychwood Project, with distinction, as its Chair over seven years.

David is a keen environmentalist, a former long-term chairman of the Campaign to Protect Rural England (CPRE) and Deputy Lieutenant of Oxfordshire with notable prior roles in business. David is also a local farmer who has lived at Bruern since 1947 where he is currently engaged in creating a flood management and tree planting project on his farm with the help of The Environment Agency.

David Astor said: “I am delighted to take on the Chair of the Wychwood Project, a cause close to my heart and one which I have supported as a patron since its inception. In these turbulent times it is more important than ever that we do all we can to protect and enhance our countryside for future generations.”

Neil’s appointment follows the tenure and strong contribution of Sharon Williams as the Wychwood Project’s Director since 2015. Neil has over 25 years of experience in the fields of conservation biology and landscape ecology, supported by degrees in Biological Sciences and Environmental Assessment and Management. He has applied his skills in a range of scientific, commercial consultancy and non-profit organisations.

Neil Clennell said: “As an Oxfordshire resident for thirteen years and a Wychwood local for the last three, I have great affection for this part of the world. The former Wychwood Forest area still boasts some fine landscapes and important wildlife habitats. These can be the building blocks for sympathetic restoration of more of our countryside, making our local environment even more valuable for both people and wildlife. This is a very exciting time to be joining the Wychwood Project and I’m looking forward to playing my part in building on the organisation’s impressive history of success."

Cynthia Sweeney Barnes, a trustee and Wychwood Project Board Member said: "The Board wishes to thank Richard Lord and Sharon Williams for the considerable contribution they have made, as Chair and Project Director respectively, in expanding the reach and impact of the Wychwood Project over the past several years. We are excited that David and Neil will be joining the Wychwood Project as we move to the next phase of the charity’s evolution. Both David and Neil bring a wealth of experience across environmental stewardship, education, conservation and general management and are well placed to continue and build upon the progress the Wychwood Project has made in expanding access to the countryside through its various programmes of conservation, restoration, learning and engagement."

Ends.

 

Accounts & Annual Report. 

The Wychwood Project iaccounts and annual report for 1 April 2017 to 31 March 2018 are available here.

 

 
 
In a Nutshell - A look at the state of our woodlands

 

State Of Nature In Oxfordshire 2017 'MORE, BIGGER, BETTER, JOINED'

If we wish to be the first generation to leave the natural environment in a better state than that in which we found it, we must first assess its condition.  The State of Nature in Oxfordshire 2017 draws together a wealth of expertise from the country's professional and volunteer base in biodiversity and nature conservation.  The best information currently available has been used to paint a picture of the state of Oxfordshire's natural habitats and species, including long-term trends and more recent losses and gains.  Read the summary report here.

 

Students Get Practical Experience with the Wychwood Project

Thanks to Abingdon & Witney College who came to Wigwell Nature Reserve to put up a much needed new stock fence.